Indieterria review – No More Moves by The Dirt

Dear Readers,

Don’t be cancelling 2020 yet. It may be a year of no festivals, virtual gigs and staying indoors but the art it produces is jaw dropping. Actually, it is a heavy weight year for creativity. Knock out after knock out from every corner – with no breather.  Just look at March alone. Two weeks passed from the release of False Heads` album (record of the year most likely) and we have a new single from Saytr Play, 20 dates autumn tour from Hands Off Gretel  and a much anticipated debut from The Red Stains on the cards.

If that wasn’t enough to make us at Vanadian Avenue sleep deprived  – an unexpected EP from Manchester duo The Dirt appeared in our inbox this morning. And we just had to squeeze it into the schedule because otherwise it would be a serious breach of Directive #1

Sachiko Wakizaka and Jack Horner aka The Dirt

What`s Directive #1 you ask? In short terms – what Manchester does today, the rest of the country does tomorrow. And if you ignore it, then you prove yourself to be a pompous wannabe with no real knowledge of pop culture.

If you don’t know The Dirt, don’t worry. Until about 11 AM today we had no clue either. But once they appeared on our radar, we quickly did the catching up.

The band consist of Japanese guitarist (and multi instrumentalist) Sachiko Wakizaka and Mancunian poet Jack Horner (known under his moniker “Leon The Pig Farmer”). On March 19th the duo quietly dropped their first EP “No More Moves” on BandCamp – a seven track (22 minutes) full of psychedelic, experimental, shoe-gazing landscapes accompanied by dark, tense lyrical verses.

The band succeeded in creating a record that can stand next to releases of Mr Bungle or The Legendary Pink Dots without feeling ashamed. If you take each track separately, they almost feel like punk songs – all below three minutes. The longest – most angry track on the album  – “Wiccan Transition” stands at 5 minutes and could easily find itself among Sonic Youth`s deep cuts.

You can take “No More Moves” as one long composition – a sonic meditation on human nature and its dark sides.


Everything on the EP is dirty, grungy and heavy. Even the logo – the band uses a kanji sign 泥 (pronounced “doro”) as its calling card. It roughly translates into “the dirt” but may mean “mud”, “mire” and “ooze” and we have to applaud them for putting a lot of thought into the vision and then trying to obscure it. You have to dig though the layers of sounds, language and symbols to truly appreciate the work Sachiko Wakizaka and Jack Horner did. You have to unearth it so to speak.

The Dirt created a very experimental,  noise, avant-garde record that nobody saw coming. They appeared out of nowhere with artistic vision, DIY ethos, rebellious spirit to mix beat poetry with psychedelic sounds and reminded everyone that the underground scene in Manchester is healthy and potent.

It would be an excellent idea to incorporate them into future Louder Than Words festivals. This duo has a lot to offer to the public.

We have spoken briefly to Jack Horner about the EP to go along this review. This is what he had to say:

The Dirt looking out into the psychedelic future

How long did it take to record the EP and where did you do it?

Jack Horner:  We did it over  a few weeks, trying not to spend much time on each track. We wanted it raw and quick takes. We recorded at my house. Proper DIY feel. Did the guitars first, then laid my words on.

So it was just you and Sachiko Wakizaka working together?

Jack Horner:  Yeah, Sachiko uses loop and effects pedals for the guitars.

So full musical partnership.

Jack Horner:   Yes. Full on partnership. It works well. We seem to have a good collaboration and creative system. Probably we will go live in autumn. I’ll keep Leon ticking along too.

You wanted to explore something outside poetry?

Jack Horner:  I used words and verses that don’t feel right on my solo spoken word set.  They may be too heavy, too dark or just not suited. But I think the guitars work compliments them.

We really like Wiccan Transition. It`s the longest track on the EP. You could nearly call it a leading single.

Jack Horner: (laughs) Oh ta!

Any story behind that track?

Jack Horner:  I went to see a spiritual healer. Crystal Therapy. I went into a crazy trance. It’s that and coming out the other side of depression!

I`m not sure which song  to put out as a single if we do.

So really The Dirt is a project to help you deal with mental health as well as creative process.

Jack Horner:  That’s how Leon The Pig Farmer started as well. Writing thoughts after a breakdown and stuff last year.  Then taking words to the stage. This is an experiment to take it elsewhere…who knows where.

That’s the beauty of my life now. I don’t set goals, plans or directions to get anxious about. It seems to work!

You can follow Jack Horner/ The Dirt on the socials:

https://www.facebook.com/LeonThePigFarmer/
https://twitter.com/leon_pig
https://www.instagram.com/leontpf71/
https://thedirt71.bandcamp.com/

It will be a very interesting experience to see the duo live in concert and we are hoping that we will have a chance to do so. If we do, please expect a full set video and a ton of pictures. And a word of advice. Do not underestimate the underground. You have no idea what lurks in one of those narrow streets behind AATMA…

Mal/Rita

**** 05.04.2020****

Just a small update to let everyone know that The Dirt published their third visual trailer announcing new material coming in the next months. It showcases the band`s interest in Manchester`s creative Northern Quarter and signals a more refined musical landscape – with the use of drum machines and beats. We knew The Dirt was unique project on Mancunian music scene but the rate it grows and changes is just stunning! Our hats are off to Sachiko Wakizaka and Jack Horner for being absolute proper legends.

M/R

Indieterria meets Karl Hildebrandt

Dear Readers,

There is nothing better than to interview a poet. They are the people who understand life, who know their scene and who quietly put into words what we cannot even express. In a way, they are chroniclers of victories and struggles of life. It was Czesław Miłosz who said that the poet remembers and it is very true. So it was a true pleasure and privilege to speak to Manchester`s finest spoken word artist and poet – Karl Hildebrandt ahead of Musicians Against Homelessness gig on 21st August at The Night People.

Karl is known not only for his extraordinary poems but also for his active involvement in music and his charity work on a local level. Proper stuff as they say in Mancunia.

Mosh Pit Poet Laureate – Karl bringing poetry to the gigs.

You are a man of many talents: multi – instrumentalist, spoken word artist, poet, roadie and a stage hand. Please introduce yourself to the readers of Indieterria.

Karl Hildebrandt: I’ve had a love of music and words since an early age. Bother listening and eventually playing. I’ve always written words. Just never had the nerve to do it live till about 5 years ago. “Mancunian Gobshite” sums me up to be honest.

Dark and witty poetry has won you many notable fans: Denise Johnson, Dave Haslam, MC Tunes to mention a few. You take daily conversations, occurrences and fleeting moments and turn them into heart wrenching observations.  What inspires you?

Karl Hildebrandt: Life inspires me. I tend to brain dump either on paper or my phone. I see the good and the shitty bits and write it down. In the last 8 months or so, my prose has become a lot lighter than previously. I am happy and in love.

You have been performing at concerts, open mic nights and  jam sessions earning yourself a nick name “Mosh Pit Poet Laureate”.  Do you see spoken word as a part of a regular gig? There are still many people out there who think poetry belongs in libraries, not concert halls.

Karl Hildebrandt: I think poetry and spoken word is becoming a bit more popular. A pot of acts are putting words over music. I am, but I prefer the purity of just getting up to “shout at the traffic”. If people hear you, they’re listening.

Looking out for inspiration.

For a while you have been in a band The G-O-D with Chris Bridgett (Dub Sex) and Simon Wolstencroft (Ian Brown, The Fall) as a bassist. Do you think this project will make a come back?

Karl Hildebrandt: No. Chris has a new project called Cold Water Swimmers, who are amazing. And Simon is busy doing what Simon does, being Funky Si. In the San Pedro Collective.

Please tell us about your involvement in San Pedro Collective – another musical project that you are a part of. San Pedro just released an EP that gathered rave reviews in the music press. Is that true that one of the songs was inspired by your mother?

Karl Hildebrandt: The San Pedro Collective is the brainchild of Manchester’s finest maverick, Rikki Turner. His vision to bring artists and musicians together to create something unique for the eyes and ears is genius. The Demon Sessions EP is being rehearsed for live work. Gigs are coming up. And the next single will be dropping soon. And yes, inspired by me losing my mum, but it’s a paean to loss of any kind.

If you had to chose one particular poetry movement to identify  with, which one would it be? Beatniks, Modernists or maybe something more old school like The Cavaliers?

Karl Hildebrandt: The Beats. I hate structure within any art form. Be it music, poetry, art or whatever. I feel hemmed in by conformity. Burroughs, Kerouac and Ginsberg helped me understand you can be honest about writing and not worry about what you’ve written. Never be afraid to create.

You are also known for your charity work, often contributing to incentives as Musicians Against Homelessness. Can you tell us about this charity and its work?

Karl Hildebrandt: MAH was set up by Alan McGee and Emma Rule to create a platform for musicians and creatives to raise both funds and awareness for homelessness. In the North West we have Andy White and Angela Moore, co-coordinating gigs and events. Both top people as well. I’m also doing some spoken word for Action Against Hunger at Moovin Festival for Deborah Faulkner-Moscrop and I’ve done stuff for various other charities. Give it – you get it back.

If you don`t have a pen and paper, mobile phone is a great tool to record poems!

On 21st August you will appear at Night People as part of a fundraiser to fight homelessness.  Who is on the bill and what can we expect from your set?

Karl Hildebrandt: The gig is on at Night People on Princess Street in Manchester. Top line up including acoustic sets from Thomas from The Blinders, Scuttlers, Afghan Sound Gang and Maddy Storm amongst others. And me, of course. I found a poem, a poem I couldn’t remember writing which will fit the bill. I supported Dave Johns (Daniel Blake) at Moston Miners and recorded it on the bus on the way home. It’s very, very sweary.

Imagine that one of your works is to appear in anthologies or school syllabuses, like John Cooper Clarke`s “I Wanna Be Yours”. Do you have a poem that you consider your major or most significant piece?

Karl Hildebrandt: I honestly don’t know. My stuff contains far too many swear words, but if I had to choose one, “Another Bastard List Poem About Manchester”. I’ve done a Liverpool version and have been asked for a London version as well.

We can`t pass this opportunity. Do you think we can get a haiku out of you about Indieterria?

Karl Hildebrandt:  Sorry, I struggle with haiku. I’ll get my mate Dave Norman to do one for you. Here’s one of my favourites though:

“The taste of rain
Why kneel?” –

Jack Kerouac

Proper.

You can follow Karl on the socials (you know those pesky online pages), but he is often found at the nearest Social or other boozer/venue in the neighbourhood.

https://mitherdimps.wordpress.com/
https://soundcloud.com/mither
https://www.facebook.com/karl.hildebrandt1
https://twitter.com/RTransmissions

Essential reading:

http://essentiallypop.com/epop/2016/02/holy-trinity-new-punk-trio-the-g-o-d-features-members-of-dub-sex-the-fall-and-ian-browns-band
http://www.soundspheremag.com/spherecast/listen-spoken-word-karl-hildebrandt-will-it-be-forever/

 

Poster for MAH gig on 21st August 2019

You can see Karl (and many others) doing their thing for Musicians Against Homelessness on 21st August 2019 at The Night People in Manchester. Tickets are £5.

Event page:
https://www.facebook.com/events/703946873388361/

Tickets page:
https://www.fatsoma.com/night-people/cvr968u0/musicians-against-homelessness-night-people

The full line up is as follows:

Thomas Haywood (The Blinders)
Afghan Sand Gang
Scuttlers (acoustic set)
Ellysse Mason
Maddy Storm
Karl Hildebrandt
Shot by a Shotgun Slug

We are proud to say that we will be attending MAH gig at The Night People so there will be a lot to report back! We are hoping to see some of you down the front.

M/R

Indieterria meets Vinny Peculiar

Dear Readers,

This edition of Indieterria will profile an artist who is not a new starter. To be honest, he is well established and enjoys cult status among music fans. However, discovering new music doesn’t mean only cheeking out musicians on their first demo. There is a lot to learn from artists of all ages and all periods. As John Peel would say – you cannot limit yourself to one genre or one decade. It was a pleasure and privilege (to quote a classic) to sit down with Vinny Peculiar and talk about his art and music. And we will admit, we learned few things. Now, we wait in anticipation to see Vinny perform at Marr`s Bar on September 22 for Musicians Against Homelessness. Read on!

Man of many talents

Alan Wilkes, better known as Vinny Peculiar, is one of the most respected and original artists in the music business today. Splitting his time between his native Worcestershire and adopted home in Manchester, he has established himself as a poet, musician and writer. Finding a spare second in his busy schedule, Alan sat down with us to talk about receiving his own blue plague, new album inspired by growing up in West Midlands and charitable efforts to support local events.

You are a man of many talents – a performer, musician, poet, writer and educator. What is the difference between Alan Wilkes and Vinny Peculiar? Are you one and the same or is Vinny simply your artistic alter ego?

Vinny Peculiar: Thank you, I try and dabble in a few different things. Sometimes they work out but I’m most comfortable as a musician/songwriter. The Vinny Peculiar alter ego has been around for a while now but deep down, I’m one and the same person. The real difference is, I get to elaborate and take more risks as Vinny – perhaps the function of the alter ego is a permission to lose yourself. You’ve got me over thinking this one!

So far you have released 13 albums and EP’s to great critical acclaim, with genre-defying releases such as “Other people like me” or “Non Compliance” among them.  If you could choose one record from your catalogue that you value the most, what would it be and why?

Vinny Peculiar: I’d go for “Ironing the Soul”.  This record has got me a lot of breakthrough press and I made it with a band of mates in Liverpool, during stolen overnight studio time whilst trying to hold down a proper job! There’s certain urgency about it and some of those 4am vocal takes seem suitably desperate for the songs. Nowadays, I’m spending weeks editing acoustic guitar parts on a Mac which is not quite the same buzz. “Ironing the Soul” is kind of an oldschool.

cover of Silver Meadows

Vinny Peculiar is independent music press darling. Uncut magazine called you “an under sung national treasure” and “Tony Hancock of pop”; Q Magazine heralded you to be “a warm-hearted Morrissey” and The Irish Times convinced their readers you are the missing link between Jarvis Cocker and Roger McGough. How do you feel about those comparisons? Are they something you personally agree with? 

Vinny Peculiar: Music press darling you say? Hmm, I’m not sure about that but yes; I have had some great press from the major glossy UK magazines. I think this is partly because my stuff is easy to write about. There is usually a narrative story and some quotable lyrics. UNCUT named one of my songs the fourth best song title of 2004 with “We Tried to Drown Our Music Teacher in 1974”, you can see what I mean.

Your musical style escapes every attempt at classification, forcing reviewers to come up with pretty interesting suggestions such as poetry punk, urban lyricists or even “a beautiful blend of Americana, poetry, indie-pop and busker-punk”. It must be satisfying to see them grind their teeth in frustration every time you release new material. Do you still consider yourself to be part of outside pop movement? 

Vinny Peculiar: Yes, I don’t see music as a defined genre thing; often the most incongruous elements can make a song work or not. I try to be driven by what particular song needs. It doesn’t always work, mind! My Outsider status is probably always going to be a given. I’ve never been the new EMI Darling, or even the New Old Man on the Block. I was rather a late starter in the songwriter game! What I try is to follow the Ray Davies model and just “keep on working”.  There comes a time when you write and perform because that’s what you do and over analysis is futile, so I tell myself…

Photo by David Bailey

Many of your songs are autobiographical. You grew up in north Worcestershire village of Cathill, in a strict Methodist home. Your childhood experiences, vocational training as a nurse and a serious illness in the family are recurring themes in your lyrics. Mental well-being and finding hope against the odds seems to be very important to you. 

Vinny Peculiar: Autobiographical, yes. I think most songwriters write about themselves under some disguise; some do it better [or worse] than others. And yes again, for me personally, holding your head up is everything. We are such a marginalized society and we need hope more than ever. I have found that sharing experiences, often everyday ones, in songs and poems really helps. I try and bring this model to the workshops – people have so much to express, much more than they realise and it can aid their self-esteem and mental well-being. That’s my plug for the workshops done!

 You have strong ties not only with Worcester but also with Manchester to the point of Manchester Evening News claiming you as the city’s own. For many years you have collaborated with the Mancunian finest – Andy Rourke of the Smiths, Bonehead of Oasis or the members of the punk group, The Fall. You also supported the renovation of the iconic Salford Lads Club with frequent gigs. Do you feel at home in the north? 

Vinny Peculiar: It’s been fascinating to be back home and closer to family. I’ve ended up writing songs based on local events and issues. At the same time, I love The North.  I’m still working on the “Silver Meadows” stage play in Liverpool. It’s taking forever to refine, get the right actors, but we are still hopeful it will come off. I was at Salford Lads Club recently and got awarded a blue plaque; other recipients included Wayne Rooney and Maxine Peake. It was a great promo idea for the club, and I was stupidly happy to receive it. I’m planning another Lads Club Fundraiser before Christmas, date to be confirmed shortly.

Your artistic escapades link you closely to the eccentric genius of Bill Drummond (KLF, SOUP ART) – master of anarchistic and thought provoking happenings and art installations. Can you tell us more about your co-operation?

Vinny Peculiar: I was the Artist in Residence [Musical] opposite Bills Artist In Residence [Visual] at The Cathedral Arts Festival In Belfast in 2005. Bill and I shared a flat for 10 days and I went on to do many house concerts with him as part of The Soup Line Project. Bill would make soup and deliver a lecture and I would play a forty minute set of songs. I still keep in touch and look forward to the all new singing, dancing and thought provoking KLF! I also have the dubious honour of being auctioned song by song by Bill in Kensington, Liverpool at the demolition of a high rise block – he managed to sell a one to one version of “Confessions of a Sperm Donor” to a local business woman for £200.  It was quite a night…

Recently your album “Silver Meadows (Fables from the Institution)” has been turned into a stage play by Liverpool writer Ian Salmon. The initial reviews are fantastic. Where did the idea come from and where can we see it?

Vinny Peculiar: The Silver Meadows songs came from my time working in long stay Learning Disability and Psychiatric Hospitals. The album is set in the mid-1980s at the dawn of Community Care. The songs are character driven, they tell little stories of big changes. We’ve had an initial full run through before an invited audience and I’m still working on the fine details of the production. These things take a long time as they involve so many different people, including funder.  It is never straightforward, but we are determined it should be seen…

On 22nd of September, you will return to Marrs Bar in Worcester to perform an acoustic set during Musicians Against Homelessness concert in support of Crisis, an nationwide charity helping homeless people to find a stable and permanent accommodation. Are you planning something special for the night?

Vinny Peculiar: I’ll be doing the Mars Bar show with Rob Steadman, my regular piano player. Rob was in Parlour Flames with me (the band I formed with Bonehead). We’ll be playing songs from the new locally themed album including “The Malvern Winter Gardener” and “Droitwich”. It is scandalous that we still have such a housing homeless crisis in the UK and we fully support the work of Crisis. I’m really pleased to have been asked to play this gig.

We know you are currently working on a new album inspired by Worcestershire and your childhood in Bromsgrove. Several demos have already been posted on Sound cloud website. What else is planned for the nearest future?

Vinny Peculiar: My forthcoming gig highlights include playing The 100 Club in London with Chris Difford, the date has not been confirmed yet.  I’m excited about that, we recently supported him in Malvern and he is a very decent chap, too. The new album will take some time to finish, it is due early next year and we will be touring to support it. I have formed a new band with local Worcester musicians: Dan Bramhall (drums), Wes Dance (guitars) and Rooney Wooster (bass) and we are recording a new live EP soon too – I will let you know when it is ready!
You can follow Vinny at the links below:

www.vinnypeculiar.com
www.facebook.com/vinny.peculiar
https://soundcloud.com/vinnypeculiarmusic

Musicians Against Homelessness charity concert will take place on September 22nd 2017 at Marrs Bar

If you want to see Vinny Peculiar  play Musicians Against Homelessness concert, tickets are a £5 and can be bought from the links below:

https://www.wegottickets.com/event/413506
http://www.marrsbar.co.uk/events/musicians-against-homelessness-2/
https://www.facebook.com/events/106395143421500

To find out more about MAH visit Musicians Against Homelessness on Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/mahgigs/

Hoping to see you soon,

Mal+Rita